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Amber Valley Ramblers, Derbyshire

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Home Diary Walks Calver Rowland 23 Apl 2017

Calver Rowland 23 Apl 2017

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Walk Diary Sunday 23 April 2017 Weather,12°C. superb.
Calver Depart 10 a.m. 9 ½ miles Leader: David D.
No. on walk 14

My privilege to lead today and what a day it turned out to be, the sun shone throughout, with just a little cooling breeze on some of the tops. My chosen break stops met with approval and for lunch with some lovely views, we even allowed ourselves a little extra rest. We were accompanied with birdsong all the time, mainly from Skylarks hovering somewhere overhead, interrupted occasionally by the call of the Curlew. It was also good to see a couple of Buzzards performing aerial manoeuvres, whether because they were male and female or two males in a duel for territorial superiority, we could not tell. A small lamb, less than a week, pushed its way through fencing into the lane we were on, one of our number was able to return it almost immediately where, hopefully it found its mother for some comfort and consolation.

The first hour was all in an upward direction as we made our way from Calver to the road, Middleton Lane, just above Stoney Middleton. Up the lane, turning left at Lane Head to take our first break just before Black Harry Lane. With the break over we headed steeply downhill to Black Harry Gate. Black Harry was an 18c. highway man who plied his trade around this area where rich pickings were to be had from travellers and traders using these remote routes. Many tracks meet at Black Harry's Gate, we took the one to the right which set us on course to very nearly circumnavigate the silt lagoons. After about a mile we turned south to head uphill to Longstone Moor Farm. Here we were amazed by the number of sheep and lambs that were spread across these moors. In fact the one which was rescued had an ID number of 1425, which to my way of thinking means that there must be more than seven hundred ewes hereabouts, assuming most would have twins at the very least.

We joined the road above the farm to walk to Longstone Edge, we were not able to take the way marked path as it was simply too dangerous, being rutted by water runs over time. Instead we followed the road west, until finding a suitable place to drop down and double back along the edge to find the place chosen for our lunch stop. The place, a grassy bank of short grass and violets with a back drop of blooming yellow Gorse, the view ahead of Great Longstone and perhaps with a little stretch of the neck a view of Monsal Head.

With the extended lunch and rest time over we headed down through the Gorse to the green pastures below. Along Hard Rake to the edge of Great Longstone, turning here, to go across the fields to the small hamlet of Rowland, passing by a Donkey sanctuary as we did so. From Rowland we made the long climb up to Deep Rake, stopping at the top of the rise for an afternoon break, ok I know I'm just too kind! From the farm buildings at Deep Rake we continued ahead and then to go down a very stony track, passing under Calver Peak. It was my intention to walk Calver Low, this one little bit I didn't do on my pre-walk which proved my undoing! I marched them to the top then was unable to find the path down, so we returned to the main track and continued on into Calver village, many choosing to stop off for a cuppa before returning to the cars. A good walk and it was the good weather that made it special.

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JW1JW2JW3JW4JW5JW6JW7JW8pictures by James W.

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3a288picture by Alan C. lunchtime views

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Last Updated on Monday, 24 April 2017 07:30